If you are injured in a motor vehicle accident, you trip or a fall on someone else’s property or you are the victim of a crime and you break your femur bone, you may be entitled to compensation for your pain and suffering. There is no set amount for this award; although some states do limit the maximum that can be awarded by statute, Pennsylvania does not.

What is considered pain and suffering?

Pain and suffering refer to the lasting damage to your body and mind after an accident. It can take the form of chronic pain or excruciating pain at the time of the accident as well as mental conditions that make resuming normal activities after the accident impossible. Basic demographic information such as the plaintiff’s age, what the physical injuries were, how they were treated and whether the injuries will be permanent will be considered by the jury. The jury will also take note of the victim’s pain and mental anguish, their physical condition prior to the incident and the extent of the disfigurement.

Pain and suffering after a femur injury

When examining femur injuries in accidents, these are some of the most painful injuries that you can sustain. There are multiple types of these fractures, and they often accompany other serious injuries as well. Because the femur is the bone that bears the most weight in physical activities such as walking, limiting its use virtually guarantees that there will be pain and suffering even long after the initial fracture has healed.

Personal injury attorneys may assist you in laying out the arguments for pain and suffering compensation. An attorney experienced litigating these types of cases may be able to offer guidance throughout the process.